Best Hybrid Mattresses of 2022

By Barry Bridges

Jun 9th, 2022

Hybrid mattresses aim give you the best of both worlds when you don’t want a 100 percent innerspring, foam, or latex mattress. Hybrids combine mattress materials so that you can reap the benefits of both.

We’ve compared and reviewed over 50 hybrid mattresses. In this guide, we’ll share our top 10 best hybrid mattress reviews, and then we’ll show you what to look for when shopping in our buyer’s guide. If you don’t find what you’re looking for here, be sure to check out our top picks for the best mattress of 2022.

By clicking on the products below, we may receive a commission at no cost to you, the reader. It’s how we fund our Mattress Lab and bring you better mattress reviews and comparisons.

Best Hybrid Mattresses: Our Top-Rated Picks

Why You Can Trust Mattress Advisor

We hold ourselves to the highest standards of integrity in our product reviews and other content by incorporating real customer feedback, empirical testing and objective evaluations. Our results and recommendations are never influenced by the commission we may receive from brands, and products we receive are never guaranteed a positive review.

When we compare hybrid mattresses, we expand our review process to put additional focus on:

  • Quality of materials. Hybrids are generally thicker and heavier, so the materials in the lower layers have to bear more weight. The best hybrids use high-density foam and latex and sturdy innerspring systems with high coil counts to resist sagging.
  • Integrated design. Are the layers just stacked on top of each other or are they arranged to work in unison? The best-designed hybrids have layers strategically placed so that each one can serve its specific purpose and enhance the overall quality.

DreamCloud Premier

DreamCloud Premier
DreamCloud Premier

Best Mattress for Back Pain

Best for:

  • All sleep positions
  • Heavier people and all body types
  • Seniors
customer rating

4.8/5

our score

8.9/10

firmness

Medium-firm: 6.5/10

trial period

365 days

Because the DreamCloud Premier scores a near-perfect 9 out of 10 on pressure relief and an 8 out of 10 on spine alignment, we found this mattress to be a favorite for those with back pain.Your hips and shoulders will get a hug without unnecessary pressure, meaning you’ll awaken fresh and ready to go.

While you may experience off-gassing when unpacking, meaning there is a new-mattress smell, it should dissipate in a few hours. Also, if you must buy American-made products, you’ll want to look elsewhere for a mattress.

Read our full DreamCloud Premier mattress review.


The WinkBed

winkbed lux firm mattress 1
WinkBeds Luxury Firm

Best Firm Mattress

Best for:

  • Back sleepers
  • Stomach sleepers
  • Those with back pain

 

customer rating

4.5/5

our score

8.6/10

firmness

Medium firm: 6/10

trial period

120 days

The WinkBed is available in four firmness options: Softer, Luxury Firm, Firmer, and Plus (specifically designed for heavier people). For those of you looking for the best firm mattress with a sturdy, supportive coil layer, the WinkBed is a great choice, especially for combination sleepers.

This mattress is not the most friendly to couples and people who sleep with pets or children. That’s because its motion transfer capabilities are a bit lackluster—we ranked it a 6.4 out of 10 in that category.

Read our full WinkBeds mattress review.


Saatva Classic

saatva mattress new e1586527946280
Saatva Classic

Best Mattress for Heavy People

Best for:

  • Those who want extra support
  • People with back pain
  • Side sleepers
customer rating

4.9/5

our score

9/10

firmness

Customizable

trial period

365 days

The Saatva Classic is a luxury hybrid mattress, complete with white glove delivery, firmness customization, lifetime warranty, and eco-friendly materials. Because of its five durable and premium layers, it’s also a great mattress for many heavier people. (If you’re 300 pounds or more, the Saatva HD might be an even better match.)

You’ll enjoy luxury with this product, but you’ll likely experience a luxury price as well. Also, the Saatva Classic may not provide the pressure relief you are looking for in your hips and shoulders.

Read our full Saatva Classic mattress review.


Helix Midnight Luxe

Helix luxe product shot 1
Helix Midnight Luxe

Best Mattress for Hot Sleepers

Best for:

  • All body types
  • All sleep positions
  • Those who sleep hot
customer rating

4.5/5

our score

8.7/10

firmness

Medium firm: 6/10

trial period

100 days

The Midnight mattress has great motion isolation, so couples won’t disturb one another with nighttime movement. To top it off, Helix is ultra-cooling. It earns a near-perfect 9.5/10 for cooling in the Mattress Advisor sleep lab, making it one of the best mattresses for hot sleepers.

This mattress is on the pricey side, so it may not be the product for you if you’re on a budget. Also, its 7.5/10 motion transfer score makes it less than ideal for couples.

Read our full Helix Midnight Luxe mattress review.


Brooklyn Bedding Aurora

brooklyn aurora hybrid
Brooklyn Aurora

Best Mattress for Side Sleepers

Best for:

  • Heavy people
  • Combination sleepers
  • Couples who sleep hot
customer rating

4.7/5

our score

8.8/10

firmness

Available in soft (3/10), medium (5/10) or firm (7/10)

trial period

120 days

The Brooklyn Bedding Aurora is one of our favorite luxury hybrid mattresses. It supports all sleep positions because of the option to choose your firmness level. Side sleepers will be most comfortable with the soft plush option; the medium-firm option is great for people who toss and turn at night; firm works perfectly for back and stomach sleepers who need to sleep on top of their mattress.

Although there’s a layer of memory foam in the Brooklyn Bedding Aurora, this product may not give you the hugging sensation you’d expect from foam. Also, this mattress is a bit more expensive than you might want if you’re on a budget.

Read our full Brooklyn Bedding Aurora mattress review.


Bear Hybrid

bear hybrid mattress
Bear Hybrid

Best Mattress for Athletes

Best for:

  • Athletes/active lifestyles
  • Stomach sleepers
  • Back sleepers
customer rating

4.7/5

our score

9/10

firmness

Medium-firm: 6/10

trial period

120 days

The best mattresses for athletes will offer a restful night’s sleep and adjust to the body as you move: The Bear Hybrid does just that with its amazing responsiveness provided by the individually wrapped coil system. The Celliant cover uses Infrared Yarn Technology to promote recovery overnight.

If you sleep with a partner, kids, or pets, this may not be the ideal choice. It didn’t score well in motion transfer, a must-have for the family that shares a bed. We gave the Bear Hybrid a score of only 6.25 out of 10 in motion transfer.

Read our full Bear Hybrid mattress review.


Puffy Lux Hybrid

puffy lux hybrid lifestyle
Puffy Lux Hybrid

Best Mattress for Stomach Sleepers

Best for:

  • Stomach sleepers
  • Heavy sleepers
  • Luxury shoppers
customer rating

5/5

our score

8.3/10

firmness

Medium-Firm - 6/10

trial period

101 nights

If you’re a stomach sleeper, you need a mattress that’s firm enough to be supportive without feeling like a surfboard. The Puffy Lux Hybrid offers just that, scoring 6 out of 10 in firmness. This mattress also performed well with spine alignment.

This product may not be right for the senior shopper. That’s because there’s no white glove service, so you will have to set up the bed yourself and dispose of your old mattress on your own.

Read our full Puffy Lux Hybrid mattress review.


Leesa Sapira Hybrid

leesa hybrid mattrss
Leesa Sapira Hybrid

Best Mattress for Combination Sleepers

Best for:

  • All sleeping positions
  • People with back pain and body aches
  • Hot sleepers
customer rating

4.5/5

our score

9.4/10

firmness

Medium-firm - firm: 7/10

trial period

100 days

If you find yourself changing position throughout the night, the Leesa Sapira Hybrid is a fine choice. We found this mattress to perform well in all positions: stomach, back, and side. In all three cases, pressure relief was excellent, as was spine alignment. This makes it an ideal fit for combination sleepers.

However, we ranked it 8 for cooling, which should be cool enough for most, but maybe not enough for some. There was also some typical off-gassing when the box was first opened.

Read our full Leesa Sapira Hybrid mattress review.


Nolah Natural 11″

Nolah Natural Overview
Nolah Natural

Best Latex Hybrid Mattress

Best for:

  • Eco-conscious people
  • Those who sleep hot
  • People with joint or back pain
customer rating

4.9/5

our score

8.7/10

firmness

Meidum-Firm: 5.5/10

trial period

120 days

The Nolah Natural 11” uses Talalay latex and support coils to give a unique feel that’s both cushioning and supportive. As the name suggests, it uses natural materials, creating an environmentally friendly mattress that you can feel good about purchasing. It earns high Mattress Advisor scores for pressure relief, cooling, and responsiveness.

While this mattress makes it easy to change positions at night, it doesn’t do a very good job of isolating motion. This means if you sleep with a partner, you will likely feel their movements ripple across the surface. It also comes up short in great edge support.

Read our full Nolah Natural mattress review.


Casper Hybrid

casper hybrid hero
Casper Hybrid

Best Mattress for Couples

Best for:

  • People with back pain
  • Couples and those who co-sleep
  • Every sleeping position
customer rating

4.5/5

our score

9.4/10

firmness

Medium: 5/10

trial period

100 days

The Casper Hybrid adds durable pocket coils to its original model. The layered support considers all sleep styles: shoulder support for side sleepers, spinal support for back sleepers, and pelvis and chest support for stomach sleepers. On top of that, this mattress offers great motion isolation and wonderful responsiveness, making it a great choice for couples.

This product may not provide the support a plus-size sleeper is looking for. If you weigh more than 230 pounds, take a look at the Casper Wave Hybrid.

Read our full Casper Hybrid mattress review.

How to Choose the Right Hybrid Mattress

Shopping for a mattress can be a confusing process. Even once you’ve narrowed your options down to the category of hybrid mattresses, you have a ton of options and many factors to consider before you find the right one for you.

This buyer’s guide can serve as a checklist as you determine if a particular hybrid mattress is a good fit for you. In this guide, we’ll cover:

What Is a Hybrid Mattress?

Traditionally, a hybrid mattress referred to a mattress that combined an innerspring coil support core with a comfort layer of memory foam, latex, or specialty polyurethane foam (also known as polyfoam). Technically, a bed made with two or more materials can be classified as a hybrid. A true hybrid mattress should be made with a thick comfort layer (at least 2 inches of foam or latex) on top of a coil support core.

The image below shows a typical hybrid design, which includes a layer of coils topped by a transition foam layer and a foam comfort layer.

Related: What is a Hybrid Mattress?

Hybrid vs Innerspring

Traditional hybrids and innerspring mattresses are very similar. Innersprings have a core layer of coil springs cushioned on either side by foam. Innerspring mattresses can be flipped once one side of foam is no longer comfortable.

Traditional hybrid mattresses have a more intentional layer construction. They use different types of foam (whether that be gel foam or another infusion) and often can’t be flipped because of the specific layering.

Hybrid vs Memory Foam

Memory foam beds are constructed from different layers of foam ranging in density (higher density on the lower layers, more plush foam at the top). A memory foam hybrid incorporates foam plus a layer of innerspring coils.

Most high-quality foam beds excel at pressure relief and motion isolation. By including a coil layer, a hybrid design can address one key area where memory foam mattresses tend to come up short: cooling and breathability. The empty space between the coils helps promote airflow.

Foam Hybrid

Foam hybrids are made of different foam combinations and are usually a combination of memory foam and latex foam. Using latex instead of coil springs reduces motion transfer while adding the bounce both coils and latex are known for.

What is a Hybrid Mattress Made of?

Typically a hybrid mattress is made of an innerspring coil support system and topped with a comfort layer, which combines the support of a traditional innerspring mattress with the comfort that is often associated with a foam mattress.

Of all the hybrid mattress reviews we’ve done at Mattress Advisor, we’ve seen hybrid mattresses constructed of combinations of foam, coils, pillow-top, latex, and hyper-elastic polymer.

While most hybrids are moderately bouncy, generally cool, durable, responsive, and offer some contouring from the top comfort layer, the feel of a hybrid mattress depends on the specific materials used in its construction.

The following table will explain how each type of material that can be used in a hybrid mattress feels so you can piece together what to expect.

MATERIAL HOW IT FEELS
Memory foam
  • Soft
  • Contouring
  • Sinking in or “hug” feeling
  • Great pressure relief
  • Retains heat
Specialty polyfoam
  • Some contouring
  • Okay pressure relief
  • Slight heat retention
Pillow-top or Euro top
  • Soft
  • No significant effect on temperature
  • Not very durable
Latex
  • Some contouring 
  • Some pressure relief
  • Cooling
  • Bouncy 
Hyper-elastic polymer
  • Soft but responsive
  • Pressure relieving
  • Breathable
Pocketed coils
  • Bouncy 
  • Breathable
  • Minimal motion transfer

Pros and Cons of Hybrid Mattresses

Let’s take a look at both the benefits and the disadvantages of sleeping on a hybrid mattress.

Pros

  • Balanced Comfort and Support: Hybrid mattresses combine the support of innerspring coils with the comfort of foam or other soft materials. You get a mattress that contours your body at the surface, but offers the right pushback to keep your body properly supported.
  • Ease of Movement: If a memory foam mattress gives you more sinking in than you prefer, a hybrid can balance that out. You’ll sleep on the mattress instead of in it, making it easier to shift positions in the night.
  • Airflow: The construction of hybrids make them naturally more breathable than an all-foam mattress, so you can stay cool.
  • Durability: Like any material, foam or latex degrades over time. By adding an innerspring layer, a hybrid design ensures that durable steel coils help shoulder the load rather than foam or latex alone.

Cons

  • Cost: Hybrids are among the more expensive mattresses in the market.
  • Height: If you’re looking for a low-profile mattress, you probably won’t find that in a hybrid. Many are very tall, even ranging up to 20” thick, and you may have to invest in new deep-pocketed sheets.
  • Weight: The typical hybrid is not only thicker than a regular mattress but also heavier. Their sheer bulk often makes unpacking and moving from room to room more difficult than normal.

Who is a Hybrid Mattress Good (or Bad) for?

Now that we’ve examined the pros and cons, you’re probably curious, who is a hybrid mattress well-suited for?

Good for:

  • Any sleeping position. Side, back, stomach, and combination sleepers all find comfort on hybrids. The comfort layer on top combined with the support core creates the perfect setup for a side sleeper. Back sleepers and stomach sleepers benefit from the more firm feel and support hybrids offer, and combination sleepers easily shift positions on the surface throughout the night and reap the benefits of a hybrid’s responsiveness to motion.
  • Couples. Hybrids are also a good option for couples because of the motion isolation, the natural airflow of the mattress (since more bodies equal more body heat in bed), and the bounce that hybrids provide to make other bedtime activities more enjoyable.
  • Hot sleepers. Hybrids that include innerspring layers are particularly good at promoting airflow, which enhances cooling.
  • Heavy people. Pus-size sleepers get the support their body needs from a hybrid much better than they would on many memory foam mattresses.

Bad for:

  • Budget-minded shoppers. Hybrid mattresses are some of the most expensive in the market due to their complex construction, so budget shoppers will have a more difficult time finding something in their price range.
  • Those who want ultra-softness or ultra-firmness. Hybrids aim to provide the best of both worlds, and they tend to offer a balanced comfort. If you’re looking for a super soft mattress or a super firm mattress, you typically won’t find it in a hybrid.
  • People who like easy portability. Most hybrids are on the heavy and bulky side, which can make it difficult for one person to move them. If you’re constantly adjusting your bedroom’s feng shui, a hybrid can make it a two-person job.

What to Look for in a Hybrid Mattress

Here are the key factors to consider when you’re shopping for a new hybrid bed:

Quality Materials

  • Innersprings. For hybrids with innerspring layers, tempered steel is considered the best material for mattress coils because of its durability. With a queen size hybrid, look for a coil count (the number of coils) of at least 400.
  • Memory foam. Medium-density foam (about 4 lbs per cubic foot) usually strikes the best balance between durability and the pressure relief and contouring memory foam is known for. Gel-infused foam usually sleepers cooler than regular foam.
  • Latex. Natural latex foam has a springier, more natural feel than synthetic latex. With blended latex, aim for the highest ratio of natural material to synthetic material (70% natural to 30% synthetic, for example).

Temperature Regulation

The typical hybrid benefits from a design that promotes cooling and breathability, particularly innerspring hybrids since the empty space between the coils promotes airflow.

Starting from there, latex also performs better in cooling than most types of memory foam. If you have your eye on a memory foam hybrid, remember that gel-infused foam typically sleeps cooler. Ideally, an innerspring-latex combination or innerspring with gel memory foam should provide the best cooling performance.

Each mattress we review includes a cooling score ranging from 1-10. You can see each mattress’s cooling score on its review page.

Sleeping Position

As a whole, hybrid mattresses cover a lot of ground in terms of sleeping positions. Just remember that materials and firmness levels can make a huge difference. General guidelines include:

Position Upper layers  Core layers Firmness
Side sleepers Memory foam or latex Coils or latex Medium or medium-firm
Back sleepers Memory foam or latex Coils Medium-firm
Stomach sleepers Latex or memory foam Coils or latex Firm
Combination sleepers Memory foam or latex Coils or latex Medium-firm

Pricing

Hybrid mattresses tend to be a bit more expensive than those that use one type of material, as in all-foam or all-latex. The average regular price for the hybrid mattresses featured on this page is about $1,850, a few hundred dollars more than you’d expect to pay for a typical bed.

On the other hand, the typical hybrid offers more for the money: additional layers and complex designs that aim to combine the best qualities of the materials into one package. Also keep in mind that exclusive deals and holiday sales could knock a few hundred dollars off the regular price of a hybrid.

Recap: Mattress Advisor’s Best Hybrid Beds

Here’s another look at our list of best hybrid mattresses:

Mattress Our Pick For … Mattress Advisor Score
DreamCloud Premier Best for People with Back Pain 9/10
The WinkBed Best Firm Hybrid 8.6/10
Saatva Classic Best for Heavy People 9/10
Helix Midnight Luxe Best for Hot Sleepers 8.9/10
Brooklyn Bedding Aurora Best for Side Sleepers 8.9/10
Bear Hybrid Best Hybrid for Athletes 9/10
Puffy Lux Hybrid Best for Stomach Sleepers 8.3/10
Leesa Sapira Hybrid
Best for Combination Sleepers 9.4/10
Nolah Natural 11″ Best for Latex Hybrid Mattress 8.7/10
Casper Hybrid Best Hybrid for Couples 9.4/10

FAQs

Many of the mattresses profiled on this page have a legitimate claim to being the best. Although no single mattress will fit everyone’s preferences, the best hybrids tend to share certain qualities from top to bottom, such as:

  • A memory foam comfort layer on top to provide cushioning and contouring
  • A foam transition layer in the middle that offers support for different areas of the body
  • An innerspring layer with individually wrapped pocket coils for motion isolation and responsiveness

The best hybrids also use an intentional design that aims to have the different layers work together, with each material balancing the other’s shortfalls, as opposed to just stacking layers on top of each other and calling the result a hybrid.

Yes, many hybrids are sold as bed-in-a-box mattresses—compressed, rolled up and shipped in a large, cylinder-shaped box. One notable exception is Saatva. On its website, the company says that making a mattress compressible requires using lower-quality foam and thinner coils (a position that makers of bed-in-a-box hybrids would of course dispute).

You do not need a box spring for a hybrid mattress. If it’s a hybrid that includes an innerspring layer, box springs are OK but not necessarily required. If it’s a hybrid without any springs, like a latex or memory foam option, box springs are not recommended. When in doubt, check the manufacturer’s recommendation for what type of foundation or frame to use.

The main reason many of the best hybrid mattresses cost more is the design. Engineering a multi-layer mattress with different types of materials is typically more complex than making, for example, an all-foam or all-spring mattress. On the other hand, some of the best mattresses for the money are hybrids that provide solid value for your investment.

The lifespan of a mattress varies greatly by type, but a well-made hybrid bed should last six to 10 years on average. One potential issue is that some layers could outlast others. For example, the coils in a hybrid with an innerspring layer could start losing their tension long before the foam or latex layers begin to degrade, or vice versa. In general, though, a hybrid made with quality materials in each layer could stay comfortable for several years, if not longer.